New Pressure Gauge Cover

Tools/items needed:

-Clear piece of plastic
-Low & high viscosity superglue
-Pliers
-Craft knife
-File
-Sandpaper
-Ruler
-Marker pen
-Natural cleaning putty

This is a more cosmetic mod, and while it is not really essential, since this is the last set of mods I am doing, I may as well make things look the part.  This means making a more neat looking cover for the pressure gauge, as at the moment it is just 90% of a bottle of fizzy drink joined together with another short piece of clear bottle plastic.  I did the job for now, however I had planned to change it as it looked tacky.

The first thing to do was to get some clear plastic, in which thankfully there was some lying around.

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The distance needed to cover the pressure gauge area was about 12cm x 2.5cm.  A large strip was measured out and marked with a marker pen, using a craft knife to cut a line down it to loosen it.

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With the craft knife weakening things, a long enough piece was snapped off with the pliers.

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With the ruler, marker pen and craft knife, the excess part was also then snapped off with the pliers.

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With the marker pen again, lines were drawn around each corner, this is because we are trying to create a rounder shape at either side.

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With some patience and care, I managed to pull out the older temporary transparent cheapo gauge cover, ready for the new one.

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Back to the new cover, the edges need to be snipped off.  The craft knife once again went over each line to make things easier to come off.  Two pliers were then used, one to hold the piece, and the other to snap the marked corner edges off.

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Next they need to be rounded and smoothed off, so out came the file and sandpaper.  Carefully doing each corner, they were shaped and smoothened until it looked like this.

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Now this is where I learned a bit of a lesson, superglue wasn’t the best idea for this, however I’d gone too far to go back, so decided to make it work.  Next time however if I ever do something similar again I may have to rethink.

Anyway, this is where the superglue comes in, as the new piece is going to be stuck on slotting into the grooves of the blasters shell.  I first used the high viscosity superglue, and ran one layer of it down each straight bit.

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The new clear plastic cover was then carefully slotted in to settle.

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To fill in the gaps that it would miss, along with the circular sides, low viscosity superglue was used, getting inevitable sticky fingers in the process.  Once left overnight to fully set, a problem occurred.  The vapour the glue gave off reduced the clear visibility of the plastic.  Like a really cold icy and foggy, even driving condition you don’t want to occur.

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Since it had occurred on the inside, I had no choice but open up the blaster and get rid of this crap.  I used some natural cleaning putty, and scrubbed the pressure chamber casing and the inside of the new plastic pressure gauge cover piece until it had gone to the point where you could see through it again.  Turns out the superglue had also done a bit of this to the inside of the pressure chamber casing when the plastic cap at the end was glued on, however thankfully this wasn’t disastrous.  Because of this though, it made me rethink things in the future.

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With this part done, I then put the blaster back together again for what felt like the 50th time, and the end result was clear enough for me, and much better than the cheap bottle plastic pieces taped together.

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And there we go, just covering up where the reservoir cap used to stick out now, and then it is all finished.